Symbioses between bivalves and chemosynthetic bacteria on European and African margins: summary and recent progress

Bivalves are among the dominant fauna occurring at deep-sea cold seeps, hydrothermal vents and organic falls worldwide. This is due to their ability to establish symbioses with sulphur- and methane-oxidising bacteria, which produce complex organic matter that feeds their hosts. Until recently very little data was available regarding bivalve symbioses in the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean, but thanks to recent international programs, this gap in our knowledge is currently being filled. Here we present and summarize data regarding symbioses in more than 20 species belonging to families Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Thyasiridae, and Lucinidae. This includes host and symbiont diversity, morphology, symbiont functioning and acquisition. We then compare with symbioses documented in western Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico bivalves, and discuss morphological, geographical, and evolutionary trends. In particular, strong connectivity has been suggested between metazoan populations from both sides of the Atlantic in several species (the Atlantic Equatorial Belt, AEB, hypothesis). Whether this also applies to bacterial symbionts remain to be tested. Indeed, symbiont acquisition is different among the different bivalve families, and reservoirs of free-living forms of the symbionts probably exist. Based on new data, we evaluate the AEB hypothesis for bacterial symbionts.

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First Name: 
Sylvie Marylène
Last Name: 
Gaudron
Telephone: 
0033 (0)144273781
Affiliation: 
University of Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC), UMR7138 CNRS France
First Name: 
Clara F
Last Name: 
Rodrigues
Affiliation: 
Departamento de Biologia & CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal
First Name: 
Marina R
Last Name: 
Cunha
Affiliation: 
Departamento de Biologia & CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal
First Name: 
Karine
Last Name: 
Olu-Leroy
Affiliation: 
Laboratoire Environnement Profond, Centre Ifremer de Brest, France
First Name: 
SĂ©bastien
Last Name: 
Duperron
Affiliation: 
University of Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC), UMR7138 CNRS France
Choose keywords that are most applicable to your abstract. (Three maximum.): 
Trophic relations (including symbiosis)
Abstract ID: 
CBE5-103